Carlos Javier Ortiz / Stockton, California & Chicago, Illinois

Carlos Javier is a director, cinematographer, and documentary photographer who focuses onurban life, gun violence, racism, poverty, and marginalized communities. In 2016, Carlos received a Guggenheim Fellowship for film/video. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally in a variety of venues including the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture; the Worcester Art Museum in Massachusetts; the International Museum ofPhotography and Film in Rochester, NY and the Library of Congress. In addition, his photos were used to illustrate Ta-Nehisi Coates' "The Case for Reparations" published in Atlantic Magazine (2014). His films "We All We Got" and "A Thousand Midnights" have screened at the Tribeca Film Festival, Los Angeles International Film Festival, AFI Film Festival, PBS Online Film Festival and Art Basel, Black and Blue, Stadtkino Basel cinema. Carlos Javier has taught atNorthwestern University and the University of California, Berkeley. He lives in Chicago and Oakland with his wife and frequent collaborator, Tina K. Sacks, a professor of social welfare atthe University of California, Berkeley.

Main Description:  We All We Got explores the consequences and devastation of youth violence in contemporary America from 2006 to 2013, through a mix of powerful photographs, incisive essays and moving letters from diverse individuals affected by this per
Chastity Turner, 9, was washing her dog near her grandmother’s house on the 7400 block of South Stewart Avenue when a van pulled up and three young men fired opened fire. One of the bullets hit Chastity in the back as she ran toward the house. Her father, Andre Turner, 30, may have been a target of the attack. Greater Grand Crossing, Chicago, 2009
Main Description:  We All We Got explores the consequences and devastation of youth violence in contemporary America from 2006 to 2013, through a mix of powerful photographs, incisive essays and moving letters from diverse individuals affected by this per
Albert Vaughn was killed on this block after getting into an argument with Nathaniel Tucker, who struck him in the head with a baseball bat. Albert’s family members knew him as “Lil Al.” Englewood, Chicago, 2008
Main Description:  We All We Got explores the consequences and devastation of youth violence in contemporary America from 2006 to 2013, through a mix of powerful photographs, incisive essays and moving letters from diverse individuals affected by this per
 Chicago’s lakefront is a frequent hang-out for youth during the summer months, but many young people have never been outside of their neighborhoods, let alone to the beaches along the lake. Near South Side, Chicago, 2013
Main Description:  We All We Got explores the consequences and devastation of youth violence in contemporary America from 2006 to 2013, through a mix of powerful photographs, incisive essays and moving letters from diverse individuals affected by this per
 The Bud Billiken parade, the oldest African-American parade in the country, kicks off the new school year and celebrates black life in Chicago. Washington Park, Chicago, 2013
Main Description:  We All We Got explores the consequences and devastation of youth violence in contemporary America from 2006 to 2013, through a mix of powerful photographs, incisive essays and moving letters from diverse individuals affected by this per
Balloons are released in memory of Siretha White and Starkeisha Reed during a block party on South Marshfield Avenue and West 69th Street. Englewood, Chicago, 2009
cjo-portfolio-011
An estimated 400,000 protesters took to the streets of Chicago Monday May 1, 2006 to show their support for the 11 million illegal immigrants living in the United States. Hundreds of thousands of immigrants and their supporters took part in marches across the country, part of the nationwide boycott, "Day Without an Immigrant." Chicago's march was a mostly peaceful and united message to the U.S. Congress which is debating the status of illegal immigrants.
cjo-portfolio-013
People against SB 1070 legislation celebrate outside the State Capitol building after Judge Susan Bolton came out with a decision blocking some of the most controversial parts of Arizona's Senate Bill, 1070 aimed at illegal immigration, Phoenix, Arizona 28 July 2010.