Ukraine

In June of 2016, Ukrainian women were finally given the right to serve in combat positions. Before that, they were barred from serving on the front line as part of the armed service. However, since the beginning of Maidan, despite rules, women were consistently on the front line risking their lives in volunteer positions, sometimes claiming to be "medic" on paper, and serving roles such as being snipers without legal representation from the government. According to the Ministry of Defense in Ukraine, 17,000 women are currently in the armed forces, as well as 33,000 women working as civil servants, and an uncountable number of those who are part of volunteer political groups such as Right Sector.

Female Sniper for Ukrainian Army
Nika, 24, a sniper for the Ukrainian army. 2 September 2016. Bakhmut, Donbass, East Ukraine. In June of 2016, Ukrainian women were finally given the right to serve in combat positions. Before that, they were barred from serving on the front line as part of the armed service. However, since the beginning of Maidan, despite rules, women were consistently on the front line risking their lives in volunteer positions, sometimes claiming to be "medic" on paper, and serving roles such as being snipers without legal representation from the government.
Volunteers for Ukrainian Army at Home
Jenya (7), Nastya's daughter, walks in their apartment in Kiev, Ukraine, past a Ukrainian flag signed by soldiers from the Ukrainian army. 10 September 2016. Nastya is a volunteer who is heading to the ATO (anti-terrorist operation) zone next week. Nastya regularily heads to the front line of combat. She is not affiliated with any government organization or under contract with the army. She has two children that she regularily leaves at home while heading to the front line to support soldiers. According to the Ministry of Defense in Ukraine, 17,000 women are currently in the armed forces, as well as 33,000 women working as civil servants, and an uncountable number of those who are part of volunteer political groups such as Right Sector.
Female Offiers of the Ukrainian Armed Forces / CIMIC
"Azov" and "Ribka," officers of the Ukrainian armed forces, in a shelled school building in Shyrokine, Mariupol region, East Ukraine. 5 September 2016. In June of 2016, Ukrainian women were finally given the right to serve in combat positions. Before that, they were barred from serving on the front line as part of the armed service. However, since the beginning of Maidan, despite rules, women were consistently on the front line risking their lives in volunteer positions, sometimes claiming to be "medic" on paper, and serving roles such as being snipers without legal representation from the government.
Volunteer's Apartment in Kiev, Ukraine
Photos of Nastya on the wall in her family's apartment in Kiev, Ukraine. 10 September 2016. Nastya is a volunteer who is heading to the ATO (anti-terrorist operation) zone next week. Nastya regularily heads to the front line of combat. She is not affiliated with any government organization or under contract with the army. She has two children that she regularily leaves at home while heading to the front line to support soldiers. In June of 2016, Ukrainian women were finally given the right to serve in combat positions. Before that, they were barred from serving on the front line as part of the armed service. However, since the beginning of Maidan, despite rules, women were consistently on the front line risking their lives in volunteer positions, sometimes claiming to be "medic" on paper, and serving roles such as being snipers without legal representation from the government.
Female Volunteer for Right Sector at Position, East Ukraine
Natalya, a member of the political party Right Sector, holds the hand of her husband, Vlad. She and Vlad met three years ago at the start of Maidan, and were married a year after. Together, they are stationed on the front line in Donbass. 31 August 2016. In June of 2016, Ukrainian women were finally given the right to serve in combat positions. Before that, they were barred from serving on the front line as part of the armed service. However, since the beginning of Maidan, despite rules, women were consistently on the front line risking their lives in volunteer positions, sometimes claiming to be "medic" on paper, and serving roles such as being snipers without legal representation from the government.
Right Sector Base, East Ukraine
A position of Right Sector. Donbass, East Ukraine. 31 August 2016. In June of 2016, Ukrainian women were finally given the right to serve in combat positions. Before that, they were barred from serving on the front line as part of the armed service. However, since the beginning of Maidan, despite rules, women were consistently on the front line risking their lives in volunteer positions, sometimes claiming to be "medic" on paper, and serving roles such as being snipers without legal representation from the government. According to the Ministry of Defense in Ukraine, 17,000 women are currently in the armed forces, as well as 33,000 women working as civil servants, and an uncountable number of those who are part of volunteer political groups such as Right Sector.
Female Soldier with the Border Control, Mariupol, Ukraine
Mariana, 29, a member of the border patrol, Mariupol, East Ukraine. 9 September 2016. Mariana has been in the army for five years, and has been in the ATO (anti-terrorist operations, the front line region of the war) zone for six months. According to the Ministry of Defense in Ukraine, 17,000 women are currently in the armed forces, as well as 33,000 women working as civil servants, and an uncountable number of those who are part of volunteer political groups such as Right Sector.
Nurse from Right Sector in Her Room, Ukraine
"Galya," a member of the political party Right Sector, in her room at the Ukrainian army base on the front line of Bakhmut. 31 August 2016. According to the Ministry of Defense in Ukraine, 17,000 women are currently in the armed forces, as well as 33,000 women working as civil servants, and an uncountable number of those who are part of volunteer political groups such as Right Sector.
Female Volunteer for CIMIC
"Belaya," 37, on the frontilne of Novoseliv, Mariupol region. 6 September 2016. Belaya, whose name means "white" in Russian, is an officer of the Ukrainian armed forces, representing CIMIC, a group that delivers military aid to civilians and other soldiers. Belaya is originally from Kharkov. In June of 2016, Ukrainian women were finally given the right to serve in combat positions. Before that, they were barred from serving on the front line as part of the armed service. However, since the beginning of Maidan, despite rules, women were consistently on the front line risking their lives in volunteer positions, sometimes claiming to be "medic" on paper, and serving roles such as being snipers without legal representation from the government.
Female Officers of the Border Control in Mariupol, Ukraine
Sveta, 24, an officer of the Ukrainian border patrol, works out in a courtyard of the patrol base in Mariupol, East Ukraine. 9 September 2016. According to the Ministry of Defense in Ukraine, 17,000 women are currently in the armed forces, as well as 33,000 women working as civil servants, and an uncountable number of those who are part of volunteer political groups such as Right Sector.
Volunteer for the Ukrainian Army at Home in Kiev
Nastya (26) and her daughter Jenya (7) in their kitchen's apartment in Kiev, Ukraine. 10 September 2016. Nastya is a volunteer who is heading to the ATO (anti-terrorist operation) zone next week. Nastya regularily heads to the front line of combat. She is not affiliated with any government organization or under contract with the army. She has two children that she regularily leaves at home while heading to the front line to support soldiers. According to the Ministry of Defense in Ukraine, 17,000 women are currently in the armed forces, as well as 33,000 women working as civil servants, and an uncountable number of those who are part of volunteer political groups such as Right Sector.
Soldiers from Right Sector on Position in Donbass, East Ukraine
Soldiers from the Right Sector at a base in Donbass, East Ukraine. 31 August 2016. In June of 2016, Ukrainian women were finally given the right to serve in combat positions. Before that, they were barred from serving on the front line as part of the armed service. However, since the beginning of Maidan, despite rules, women were consistently on the front line risking their lives in volunteer positions, sometimes claiming to be "medic" on paper, and serving roles such as being snipers without legal representation from the government.
Members of Right Sector at the Ukrainian Army Base, Donbass, East Ukraine
Vlad and Natalya, members of the political party Right Sector. They met at Maidan three years ago, and were married a year after. Together they serve on the front line of Bakhmut, near separatist occupied Debaltseve. 30 August 2016. In June of 2016, Ukrainian women were finally given the right to serve in combat positions. Before that, they were barred from serving on the front line as part of the armed service. However, since the beginning of Maidan, despite rules, women were consistently on the front line risking their lives in volunteer positions, sometimes claiming to be "medic" on paper, and serving roles such as being snipers without legal representation from the government.
Female Volunteer for CIMIC, East Ukraine
"Azov," 29, on the front line of Shyrokine, Mariupol region. 5 September 2016. Azov is an officer of the Ukrainian armed forces, representing CIMIC, a group that delivers military aid to civilans and other soldiers. Azov is originally from Kiev, and has been part of the armed forces for 11 years. According to the Ministry of Defense in Ukraine, 17,000 women are currently in the armed forces, as well as 33,000 women working as civil servants, and an uncountable number of those who are part of volunteer political groups such as Right Sector.
Members of the Ukrainian Army on Position in Donbass, East Ukraine
"Witcher," the commander of the 54th brigade of the Ukrainian army, at a sniper position in Donbass, East Ukraine. 2 September 2016. According to the Ministry of Defense in Ukraine, 17,000 women are currently in the armed forces, as well as 33,000 women working as civil servants, and an uncountable number of those who are part of volunteer political groups such as Right Sector. In June of 2016, Ukrainian women were finally given the right to serve in combat positions. Before that, they were barred from serving on the front line as part of the armed service. However, since the beginning of Maidan, despite rules, women were consistently on the front line risking their lives in volunteer positions, sometimes claiming to be "medic" on paper, and serving roles such as being snipers without legal representation from the government.
Female Member of the Border Control, East Ukraine
Tatiana (28), a soldier of the border patrol, Mariupol, East Ukraine. 9 September 2016. Passports are checked at a block post before civilans can enter the Donetsk region. In June of 2016, Ukrainian women were finally given the right to serve in combat positions. Before that, they were barred from serving on the front line as part of the armed service. However, since the beginning of Maidan, despite rules, women were consistently on the front line risking their lives in volunteer positions, sometimes claiming to be "medic" on paper, and serving roles such as being snipers without legal representation from the government.
Female Nurse of Right Sector on Base, East Ukraine
Natalya, a nurse of the Right Sector, unpacks her bag after moving into a new position. 31 August 2016. In June of 2016, Ukrainian women were finally given the right to serve in combat positions. Before that, they were barred from serving on the front line as part of the armed service. However, since the beginning of Maidan, despite rules, women were consistently on the front line risking their lives in volunteer positions, sometimes claiming to be "medic" on paper, and serving roles such as being snipers without legal representation from the government.
Volunteers of Right Sector at the Ukrainian Army Base, East Ukraine
Natalya and Andrei, members of the Right Sector, wait at the base of the Ukrainian army before returning to their post in Donbass, East Ukraine. 31 August 2016. In June of 2016, Ukrainian women were finally given the right to serve in combat positions. Before that, they were barred from serving on the front line as part of the armed service. However, since the beginning of Maidan, despite rules, women were consistently on the front line risking their lives in volunteer positions, sometimes claiming to be "medic" on paper, and serving roles such as being snipers without legal representation from the government.